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Dido's daughters [electronic resource] :literacy, gender, and empire in early modern England and France / Margaret W. Ferguson.

By: Ferguson, Margaret W, 1948-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, c2003Description: 1 online resource (xiv, 506 p.) : ill.ISBN: 9780226243184 (electronic bk.); 0226243184 (electronic bk.); 9780226243115 (cloth : alk. paper); 0226243117 (cloth : alk. paper); 9780226243122 (pbk. : alk. paper); 0226243125 (pbk. : alk. paper).Subject(s): European literature -- Women authors -- History and criticism | Literature, Modern -- History and criticism | French literature -- Women authors -- History and criticism | English literature -- Women authors -- History and criticism | Women and literature -- England | Women and literature -- France | Women -- Education -- England | Women -- Education -- France | Écrits de femmes anglais -- 16e siècle -- Histoire et critique | Écrits de femmes français -- 16e siècle -- Histoire et critique | Alphabétisation -- Angleterre -- Histoire -- 16e siècle | Alphabétisation -- France -- Histoire -- 16e siècle | Impérialisme dans la littérature | LITERARY CRITICISM -- Women Authors | Alfabetisme | Latijn | Moedertaal | Vrouwen | Electronic books | ლიტერატურა-- ევროპული ლიტერატურა-- მწერალი ქალებიGenre/Form: Electronic books.DDC classification: 809/.89287/0904 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
Competing concepts of literacy in imperial contexts: definitions, debates, interpretive models -- Sociolinguistic matrices for early modern literacies: paternal Latin, mother tongues, and illustrious vernaculars -- Discourses of imperial nationalism as matrices for early modern literacies -- An empire of her own: literacy as appropriation in Christine de Pizan's Livre de la cité des dames -- Making the world anew: female literacy as reformation and translation in Marguerite de Navarre's Heptaméron -- Allegories of imperial subjection: literacy as equivocation in Elizabeth Cary's Tragedy of Mariam -- New world scenes from a female pen: literacy as colonization in Aphra Behn's Widdow Ranter and Oroonoko.
Summary: Winner of the 2004 Book Award from the Society for the Study of Early Modern Women and the 2003 Roland H. Bainton Prize for Literature from the Sixteenth Century Society and Conference. Our common definition of literacy is the ability to read and write in one language. But as Margaret Ferguson reveals in Dido's Daughters, this description is inadequate, because it fails to help us understand heated conflicts over literacy during the emergence of print culture. The fifteenth through seventeenth centuries, she shows, were a contentious era of transition from Latin and other clerical modes of lit.
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ელ.რესურსი ელ.რესურსი ეროვნული სამეცნიერო ბიბლიოთეკა 1
821.111.09+821.133.1.09 (Browse shelf) Available

Includes bibliographical references (p. [435]-483) and index.

Competing concepts of literacy in imperial contexts: definitions, debates, interpretive models -- Sociolinguistic matrices for early modern literacies: paternal Latin, mother tongues, and illustrious vernaculars -- Discourses of imperial nationalism as matrices for early modern literacies -- An empire of her own: literacy as appropriation in Christine de Pizan's Livre de la cité des dames -- Making the world anew: female literacy as reformation and translation in Marguerite de Navarre's Heptaméron -- Allegories of imperial subjection: literacy as equivocation in Elizabeth Cary's Tragedy of Mariam -- New world scenes from a female pen: literacy as colonization in Aphra Behn's Widdow Ranter and Oroonoko.

Winner of the 2004 Book Award from the Society for the Study of Early Modern Women and the 2003 Roland H. Bainton Prize for Literature from the Sixteenth Century Society and Conference. Our common definition of literacy is the ability to read and write in one language. But as Margaret Ferguson reveals in Dido's Daughters, this description is inadequate, because it fails to help us understand heated conflicts over literacy during the emergence of print culture. The fifteenth through seventeenth centuries, she shows, were a contentious era of transition from Latin and other clerical modes of lit.

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