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Rhumb lines and map wars [electronic resource] :a social history of the Mercator projection / Mark Monmonier.

By: Monmonier, Mark S.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, c2004Description: 1 online resource (xiv, 242 p.) : ill., maps.ISBN: 9780226534329 (electronic bk.); 0226534324 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Mercator projection (Cartography) | Cartography -- Social aspects | Loxodrome | Peters projection (Cartography) | Navigation | Astronomy | Science | Geography | Mercator, Projection de | Cartographie -- Aspect social | Loxodromies | Peters, Projection de | Navigation | TECHNOLOGY & ENGINEERING -- Cartography | SCIENCE -- Earth Sciences -- Geography | Cartografie | Mercatorprojectie | Sociale aspecten | Culturele aspecten | Navigation | Projection de Peters | Aspect social | Loxodromie | Projection de Mercator | Cartographie | Mercator-ProjektionGenre/Form: Electronic books.DDC classification: 526/.82 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
Bearings straight? an introduction -- Early sailing charts -- Mercator's résumé -- Revealing replicas -- The Wright approach -- Travelers' aide -- Soldiering on -- On track -- Wall maps and worldviews -- Size matters -- Points of view.
Review: "In Rhumb Lines and Map Wars, Mark Monmonier offers an illustrated account of the controversies surrounding Flemish cartographer Gerard Mercator's legacy. He takes us back to 1569, when Mercator announced a clever method of portraying the earth on a flat surface, creating the first projection to take into account the earth's roundness. As Monmonier shows, mariners benefited most from Mercator's projection, which allowed for easy navigation of the high seas with rhumb lines - clear-cut routes with a constant compass bearing - for true direction. But the projection's popularity among nineteenth-century sailors led to its overuse - often in inappropriate, non-navigational ways - for wall maps, world atlases, and geopolitical propaganda."--Jacket.
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Includes bibliographical references (p. 207-229) and index.

Bearings straight? an introduction -- Early sailing charts -- Mercator's résumé -- Revealing replicas -- The Wright approach -- Travelers' aide -- Soldiering on -- On track -- Wall maps and worldviews -- Size matters -- Points of view.

"In Rhumb Lines and Map Wars, Mark Monmonier offers an illustrated account of the controversies surrounding Flemish cartographer Gerard Mercator's legacy. He takes us back to 1569, when Mercator announced a clever method of portraying the earth on a flat surface, creating the first projection to take into account the earth's roundness. As Monmonier shows, mariners benefited most from Mercator's projection, which allowed for easy navigation of the high seas with rhumb lines - clear-cut routes with a constant compass bearing - for true direction. But the projection's popularity among nineteenth-century sailors led to its overuse - often in inappropriate, non-navigational ways - for wall maps, world atlases, and geopolitical propaganda."--Jacket.

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