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Bursting the limits of time [electronic resource] :the reconstruction of geohistory in the age of revolution / Martin J.S. Rudwick.

By: Rudwick, M. J. S.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, c2005Description: 1 online resource (xxiv, 708 p.) : ill., maps.ISBN: 9780226731148 (electronic bk.); 0226731146 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Science -- Europe -- History -- 18th century | Geology -- Europe -- History -- 18th century | Geology | Science | Sciences -- Europe -- Histoire -- 18e siècle | Géologie -- Europe -- Histoire -- 18e siècle | SCIENCE -- Earth Sciences -- Sedimentology & Stratigraphy | Geologie | Historische Geologie | Geschichte 1787-1825Genre/Form: Electronic books.DDC classification: 551.7094/09033 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
Understanding the earth -- Naturalists, philosophers, and others -- Sciences of the earth -- The theory of the earth -- Transposing history into the earth -- Problems with fossils -- Reconstructing geohistory -- A new science of "geology"? -- Denizens of a former world -- Geognosy enriched into geohistory -- The gateway to the deep past -- Earth's last revolution.
Summary: In 1650, Archbishop James Ussher of Armagh joined the long-running theological debate on the age of the earth by famously announcing that creation had occurred on October 23, 4004 B.C. Although widely challenged during the Enlightenment, this belief in a six-thousand-year-old planet was only laid to rest during a revolution of discovery in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. In this relatively brief period, geologists reconstructed the immensely long history of the earth-and the relatively recent arrival of human life. Highlighting a discovery that radically altered existing pe.
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ელ.რესურსი ელ.რესურსი ეროვნული სამეცნიერო ბიბლიოთეკა 1
http://web.b.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail/detail?sid=1dede04c-eefa-4c49-92f4-029ee99b3006%40sessionmgr113&vid=0&hid=115&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#db=nlebk&AN=348536 Available

"Based on the Tarner lectures delivered at Trinity College, Cambridge in 1996."

Includes bibliographical references (p. 653-699) and index.

Understanding the earth -- Naturalists, philosophers, and others -- Sciences of the earth -- The theory of the earth -- Transposing history into the earth -- Problems with fossils -- Reconstructing geohistory -- A new science of "geology"? -- Denizens of a former world -- Geognosy enriched into geohistory -- The gateway to the deep past -- Earth's last revolution.

In 1650, Archbishop James Ussher of Armagh joined the long-running theological debate on the age of the earth by famously announcing that creation had occurred on October 23, 4004 B.C. Although widely challenged during the Enlightenment, this belief in a six-thousand-year-old planet was only laid to rest during a revolution of discovery in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. In this relatively brief period, geologists reconstructed the immensely long history of the earth-and the relatively recent arrival of human life. Highlighting a discovery that radically altered existing pe.

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