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Executing Magic in the Modern Era [electronic resource] :Criminal Bodies and the Gallows in Popular Medicine / by Owen Davies, Francesca Matteoni.

By: Davies, Owen [author.].
Contributor(s): Matteoni, Francesca [author.] | SpringerLink (Online service).
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Palgrave Historical Studies in the Criminal Corpse and its Afterlife: Publisher: Cham : Springer International Publishing : Imprint: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017.Edition: 1st ed. 2017.Description: VII, 118 p. online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9783319595191.Subject(s): Social history | History | Crime—Sociological aspects | Great Britain—History | Civilization—History | Social History | History of Science | Crime and Society | History of Britain and Ireland | Cultural HistoryDDC classification: 306.09 Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
1. Introduction -- 2. Criminal Bodies -- 3. The Corpse Gives Life -- 4. The Places and Tools of Execution -- 5. Lingering Influences -- Index.
In: Springer eBooksSummary: This book is open access under a CC BY 4.0 license This book explores the magical and medical history of executions from the eighteenth to the early twentieth century by looking at the afterlife potency of criminal corpses, the healing activities of the executioner, and the magic of the gallows site. The use of corpses in medicine and magic has been recorded back into antiquity. The lacerated bodies of Roman gladiators were used as a source of curative blood, for instance. In early modern Europe, a great trade opened up in ancient Egyptian mummies and the fat of executed criminals, plundered as medicinal cure-alls. However, this is the first book to consider the demand for the blood of the executed, the desire for human fat, the resort to the hanged man’s hand, and the trade in hanging rope in the modern era. It ends by look at the spiritual afterlife of dead criminals.
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1. Introduction -- 2. Criminal Bodies -- 3. The Corpse Gives Life -- 4. The Places and Tools of Execution -- 5. Lingering Influences -- Index.

Open Access

This book is open access under a CC BY 4.0 license This book explores the magical and medical history of executions from the eighteenth to the early twentieth century by looking at the afterlife potency of criminal corpses, the healing activities of the executioner, and the magic of the gallows site. The use of corpses in medicine and magic has been recorded back into antiquity. The lacerated bodies of Roman gladiators were used as a source of curative blood, for instance. In early modern Europe, a great trade opened up in ancient Egyptian mummies and the fat of executed criminals, plundered as medicinal cure-alls. However, this is the first book to consider the demand for the blood of the executed, the desire for human fat, the resort to the hanged man’s hand, and the trade in hanging rope in the modern era. It ends by look at the spiritual afterlife of dead criminals.

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