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Human remains : curation, reburial and repatriation / Margaret Clegg.

By: Clegg, Margaret [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Cambridge texts in human bioarchaeology and osteoarchaeology: Publisher: Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2020.Description: 1 online resource (vii, 176 pages) : digital, PDF file(s).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781316161654 (ebook).Subject(s): Human remains (Archaeology) -- History | Archaeology -- Research | Human remains (Archaeology) -- Repatriation | Human remains (Archaeology) -- Moral and ethical aspectsDDC classification: 930.1 Online resources: Click here to access online Summary: Working with human remains raises a whole host of ethical issues, from how the remains are used to how and where they are stored. Over recent years, attitudes towards repatriation and reburial have changed considerably and there are now laws in many countries to facilitate or compel the return of remains to claimant communities. Such changes have also brought about new ways of working with and caring for human remains, while enabling their ongoing use in research projects. This has often meant a reevaluation of working practices for both the curation of remains and in providing access to them. This volume will look at the issues and difficulties inherent in holding human remains with global origins, and how diverse institutions and countries have tackled these issues. Essential reading for advanced students in biological anthropology, museum studies, archaeology and anthropology, as well as museum curators, researchers and other professionals.
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Title from publisher's bibliographic system (viewed on 28 Feb 2020).

Working with human remains raises a whole host of ethical issues, from how the remains are used to how and where they are stored. Over recent years, attitudes towards repatriation and reburial have changed considerably and there are now laws in many countries to facilitate or compel the return of remains to claimant communities. Such changes have also brought about new ways of working with and caring for human remains, while enabling their ongoing use in research projects. This has often meant a reevaluation of working practices for both the curation of remains and in providing access to them. This volume will look at the issues and difficulties inherent in holding human remains with global origins, and how diverse institutions and countries have tackled these issues. Essential reading for advanced students in biological anthropology, museum studies, archaeology and anthropology, as well as museum curators, researchers and other professionals.

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