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Nietzsche, Religion, and Mood / Sampsa Andrei Saarinen.

By: Saarinen, Sampsa Andrei [author.].
Contributor(s): University of Helsinki [funder.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: Monographien und Texte zur Nietzsche-Forschung ; 71.Publisher: Berlin ; Boston : De Gruyter, [2019]Copyright date: ©2019Description: 1 online resource (X, 268 p.).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9783110621075.Subject(s): Friedrich Nietzsche | Nietzsche, Friedrich | Radikaler Atheismus | Stimmung | Säkularisierung | mood | radical atheism | secularization | PHILOSOPHY / History & Surveys / ModernAdditional physical formats: No title; No titleOnline resources: Open Access | Cover
Contents:
Frontmatter -- Preface and acknowledgements -- Contents -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Nietzsche and the inadequate secularization of the “heart” in the 19th century -- 3. Nietzsche’s psychology and the tension between body and spirit -- 4. Nietzsche’s psychology of religion in Human, All Too Human and Daybreak -- 5. On the communication of mood in Nietzsche’s Gay Science -- 6. Thus Spoke Zarathustra: Communication of mood or nihilistic self-parody? -- 7. Nietzsche’s final ideal -- 8. Nietzsche’s radical atheism? -- 9. Conclusions -- 10. Literature -- Index of Names -- Index of Subjects
Title is part of eBook package:EBOOK PACKAGE COMPLETE DG 2019 EnglishTitle is part of eBook package:EBOOK PACKAGE COMPLETE 2019 EnglishTitle is part of eBook package:EBOOK PACKAGE COMPLETE 2019Title is part of eBook package:EBOOK PACKAGE Philosophy 2019 EnglishTitle is part of eBook package:EBOOK PACKAGE Philosophy 2019Summary: How does Nietzsche, as psychologist, envision the future of religion and atheism? While there has been no lack of “psychological” studies that have sought to illuminate Nietzsche's philosophy of religion by interpreting his biography, this monograph is the first comprehensive study to approach the topic through the philosopher's own psychological thinking. The author shows how Nietzsche's critical writings on religion, and especially on religious decline and future possibilities, are informed by his psychological thinking about moods. The author furthermore argues that the clarification of this aspect of the philosopher’s work is essential to interpreting some of the most ambiguous words found in his writings; the words that God is dead. Instead of merely denying the existence of God in a way that leaves a melancholic need for religion or a futile search for replacements intact, Nietzsche arguably envisions the possibility of a radical atheism, which is characterized by a mood of joyful doubt. The examination of this vision should be of great interest to scholars of Nietzsche and of the history of philosophy, but also of relevance to all those who take an interest in the interdisciplinary discourse on secularization.
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Frontmatter -- Preface and acknowledgements -- Contents -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Nietzsche and the inadequate secularization of the “heart” in the 19th century -- 3. Nietzsche’s psychology and the tension between body and spirit -- 4. Nietzsche’s psychology of religion in Human, All Too Human and Daybreak -- 5. On the communication of mood in Nietzsche’s Gay Science -- 6. Thus Spoke Zarathustra: Communication of mood or nihilistic self-parody? -- 7. Nietzsche’s final ideal -- 8. Nietzsche’s radical atheism? -- 9. Conclusions -- 10. Literature -- Index of Names -- Index of Subjects

Open Access unrestricted online access star

https://purl.org/coar/access_right/c_abf2

How does Nietzsche, as psychologist, envision the future of religion and atheism? While there has been no lack of “psychological” studies that have sought to illuminate Nietzsche's philosophy of religion by interpreting his biography, this monograph is the first comprehensive study to approach the topic through the philosopher's own psychological thinking. The author shows how Nietzsche's critical writings on religion, and especially on religious decline and future possibilities, are informed by his psychological thinking about moods. The author furthermore argues that the clarification of this aspect of the philosopher’s work is essential to interpreting some of the most ambiguous words found in his writings; the words that God is dead. Instead of merely denying the existence of God in a way that leaves a melancholic need for religion or a futile search for replacements intact, Nietzsche arguably envisions the possibility of a radical atheism, which is characterized by a mood of joyful doubt. The examination of this vision should be of great interest to scholars of Nietzsche and of the history of philosophy, but also of relevance to all those who take an interest in the interdisciplinary discourse on secularization.

funded by University of Helsinki

Mode of access: Internet via World Wide Web.

This eBook is made available Open Access under a CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 license:

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0

https://www.degruyter.com/dg/page/open-access-policy

In English.

Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page (publisher's Web site, viewed 17. Jun 2020)

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