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Transnational Black Dialogues : Re-Imagining Slavery in the Twenty-First Century / Markus Nehl.

By: Nehl, Markus [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Postcolonial Studies ; 28.Publisher: Bielefeld : transcript-Verlag, [2016]Copyright date: ©2016Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9783839436660.Subject(s): African diaspora in literature | English literature -- Black authors -- History and criticism | English literature -- 21st century -- History and criticism | Slavery in literature | Violence in literature | African Diaspora Studies | America | American Studies | Anti-Black Violence | Black Feminist Studies | Canada | Cultural Studies | Ghana | Jamaica | Lawrence Hill | Marlon James | Memory Culture | Neo-Slave Narratives | Postcolonialism | Race | Saidiya Hartman | South Africa | Toni Morrison | U.S.A | U.S.A.,Ghana | Yvette Christiansë | SOCIAL SCIENCE / Popular CultureDDC classification: 809/.93355 Online resources: Open Access | Cover
Contents:
Frontmatter -- Contents -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction: Slavery - An "Unmentionable" Past? -- 1. The Concept of the African Diaspora and the Notion of Difference -- 2. From Human Bondage to Racial Slavery: Toni Morrison's A Mercy (2008) -- 3. Rethinking the African Diaspora: Saidiya Hartman's Lose Your Mother (2007) -- 4. "Hertseer:" Re-Imagining Cape Slaver y in Yvette Christiansë's Unconfessed (2006) -- 5. Transnational Diasporic Journeys in Lawrence Hill's The Book of Negroes (2007) -- 6. A Vicious Circle of Violence: Revisiting Jamaican Slavery in Marlon James's The Book of Night Women (2009) -- Epilogue: The Past of Slavery and "the Incomplete Project of Freedom" -- Works Cited
Title is part of eBook package:EBOOK PACKAGE COMPLETE 2016Title is part of eBook package:EBOOK PACKAGE Linguistics 2016Title is part of eBook package:transcript eBook Package English Contemporary 2016-2018Summary: Markus Nehl focuses on black authors who, from a 21st-century perspective, revisit slavery in the U.S., Ghana, South Africa, Canada and Jamaica. Nehl's provocative readings of Toni Morrison's A Mercy, Saidiya Hartman's Lose Your Mother, Yvette Christiansë's Unconfessed, Lawrence Hill's The Book of Negroes and Marlon James' The Book of Night Women delineate how these texts engage in a fruitful dialogue with African diaspora theory about the complex relation between the local and transnational and the enduring effects of slavery. Reflecting on the ethics of narration, this study is particularly attentive to the risks of representing anti-black violence and to the intricacies involved in (re-)appropriating slavery's archive.
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Frontmatter -- Contents -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction: Slavery - An "Unmentionable" Past? -- 1. The Concept of the African Diaspora and the Notion of Difference -- 2. From Human Bondage to Racial Slavery: Toni Morrison's A Mercy (2008) -- 3. Rethinking the African Diaspora: Saidiya Hartman's Lose Your Mother (2007) -- 4. "Hertseer:" Re-Imagining Cape Slaver y in Yvette Christiansë's Unconfessed (2006) -- 5. Transnational Diasporic Journeys in Lawrence Hill's The Book of Negroes (2007) -- 6. A Vicious Circle of Violence: Revisiting Jamaican Slavery in Marlon James's The Book of Night Women (2009) -- Epilogue: The Past of Slavery and "the Incomplete Project of Freedom" -- Works Cited

Open Access https://purl.org/coar/access_right/c_abf2 unrestricted online access star

Markus Nehl focuses on black authors who, from a 21st-century perspective, revisit slavery in the U.S., Ghana, South Africa, Canada and Jamaica. Nehl's provocative readings of Toni Morrison's A Mercy, Saidiya Hartman's Lose Your Mother, Yvette Christiansë's Unconfessed, Lawrence Hill's The Book of Negroes and Marlon James' The Book of Night Women delineate how these texts engage in a fruitful dialogue with African diaspora theory about the complex relation between the local and transnational and the enduring effects of slavery. Reflecting on the ethics of narration, this study is particularly attentive to the risks of representing anti-black violence and to the intricacies involved in (re-)appropriating slavery's archive.

Mode of access: Internet via World Wide Web.

This eBook is made available Open Access under a CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0 http://www.transcript-verlag.de/open-access-bei-transcript

In English.

Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page (publisher's Web site, viewed 15. Jun 2019)

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