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The elusiveness of the ordinary [electronic resource] : studies in the possibility of philosophy / Stanley Rosen.

By: Rosen, Stanley, 1929-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New Haven : Yale University Press, c2002Description: 1 online resource (viii, 327 p.).ISBN: 0300091974 (hardcover : alk. paper); 9780300091977 (hardcover : alk. paper); 9780300129526 (electronic bk.); 0300129521 (electronic bk.); 1281730335; 9781281730336.Subject(s): Ordinary-language philosophy | Electronic books | Philosophie du langage ordinaire | PHILOSOPHY -- Movements -- Post-Structuralism | Spreektaal | Gezond verstand | ფილოსოფიაGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Elusiveness of the ordinary.DDC classification: 149/.94 LOC classification: B945.R526 | R67 2002ebOnline resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
Politics and nature in Montesquieu -- Husserl's conception of the life-world -- Kant and Heidegger: transcendental alternatives to Aristotle -- Wittgenstein, Strauss, and the possibility of philosophy -- Moore on common sense -- Austin and ordinary language -- What do we talk about? -- The attributes of ordinary experience -- Concluding remarks.
Summary: The concept of the ordinary, along with such cognates as everyday life, ordinary language and ordinary experience, has come into special prominence in late-modern philosophy. Thinkers have employed two opposing yet related responses to the notion of the ordinary: scientific and phenomenological approaches on the one hand, and on the other, more informal or even anti-scientific procedures. Philosopher Stanley Rosen here presents a comprehensive study of the main approaches to theoretical mastery of ordinary experience. He evaluates the responses of a wide range of modern and contemporary thinkers and grapples with the peculiar problem of the ordinary - how to define it in its own terms without transforming it into a technical - and so, extraordinary - artefact. Rosen's approach is both historical and philosophical. He offers Montesquieu and Husserl as examples of the scientific approach to ordinary experience; contrasts Kant and Heidegger with Aristotle to illustrate the transcendental approach and its main alternatives; discusses attempts by Wittgenstein and Strauss to return to the pre-theoretical domain; and analyzes the differences among such thinkers as Moore, Austin, Grice and Russell with respect to the analytical response to ordinary language. Rosen concludes with a theoretical exploration of the central problem of how to capture the elusive ordinary intact.
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ელ.რესურსი ელ.რესურსი ეროვნული სამეცნიერო ბიბლიოთეკა 1
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Includes bibliographical references and index.

Politics and nature in Montesquieu -- Husserl's conception of the life-world -- Kant and Heidegger: transcendental alternatives to Aristotle -- Wittgenstein, Strauss, and the possibility of philosophy -- Moore on common sense -- Austin and ordinary language -- What do we talk about? -- The attributes of ordinary experience -- Concluding remarks.

The concept of the ordinary, along with such cognates as everyday life, ordinary language and ordinary experience, has come into special prominence in late-modern philosophy. Thinkers have employed two opposing yet related responses to the notion of the ordinary: scientific and phenomenological approaches on the one hand, and on the other, more informal or even anti-scientific procedures. Philosopher Stanley Rosen here presents a comprehensive study of the main approaches to theoretical mastery of ordinary experience. He evaluates the responses of a wide range of modern and contemporary thinkers and grapples with the peculiar problem of the ordinary - how to define it in its own terms without transforming it into a technical - and so, extraordinary - artefact. Rosen's approach is both historical and philosophical. He offers Montesquieu and Husserl as examples of the scientific approach to ordinary experience; contrasts Kant and Heidegger with Aristotle to illustrate the transcendental approach and its main alternatives; discusses attempts by Wittgenstein and Strauss to return to the pre-theoretical domain; and analyzes the differences among such thinkers as Moore, Austin, Grice and Russell with respect to the analytical response to ordinary language. Rosen concludes with a theoretical exploration of the central problem of how to capture the elusive ordinary intact.

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